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20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
monday night on "the communicators" on c-span2. next, 10 years of the e- government act, improving government access and productivity. this is just over one hour. >> all right, so why do we not just jump into this next panel? if ms. panel was about the tenures, this panel is really about the next 10 years. what are the big challenges year, what are the things different now? from a technology perspective, this is pretty easy. i can tell you that if we were to do this today, you would say, i cannot believe you were using lte phones and 4g, as i am using 6g. joining us is a director for cisco systems business solution group, which is a global strategy and consulting arm. prior to that, he was president and ceo of government's strategy is of a leading market research firm from 2001 to 2003 heading the industry advisory council, a founding member of a council, and he spent 28 years in the federal government, including being the first cio at the department of commerce, and he is also a winner. doug bourgeois is the chief for vmware. prior to that, he was the director of national business
? >> the views of a top chinese government leaders is to have great confidence in the u.s. economy. they have made those statements to the top american leaders that have gone, all the way from vice president biden, and xi jinping met with president obama in february of last year. they expressed great confidence in united states. they're always asking about how the recovery is going. they believe that we will get our fiscal house in order. they know how dependent they are, and that is why they want a strong -- >> to the understand the internal struggle between the president and congress? >> i think they're starting to understand that more and more. the ambassadors to have our government officials about studied. united states -- they have are government officials who have studied in the united states. the congress does not necessarily speak for the president. >> he said something quite interesting. he said he could not understand why the u.s. government should have three branches, in effect three governments within a government because it was difficult to get stuff done. [laughter] he was right
to the federal budget, how big is the federal budget? how much money does the government take in? how much do we spend? how much is $167 trillion for the current debt? guest: spending this year will be $33.8 trillion. the deficit of about $1 trillion that is for fiscal 2013. that assumes that somehow the fiscal cliff doesn't happen and we don't reduce the deficit by $600 billion. national debt, about $16 billion , debt held by the public -- as a percentage it is getting up there. we've had it before. as we talked about two weeks ago it is not so much that the size of the debt it is how fast the debt is growing in comparison to the size of the economy. you don't want to pay off the debt but you want it to fall. host: how did we get to this point? why is the government spending so much and under this president, we've seen the debt go up $1 trillion each year over the last four years. where is it going? guest: there are two main ways to look at it. right now, we're still coming out of this economic crisis. so you have large debts for four years mainly because you have low revenues as people don't h
think that most americans are members of the tea party principally. we believe in limited government. we believe in lower taxes. we believe in keeping the government out of your pockets. if you believe in freekts, -- free markets, those are the basic tenets of the tea party. i would hope we all believe in that. that would be a decisive yes. >> \[inaudible] >> you look at his scorecard with the heritage action. he was a 98 and i was closing in on i think it was a 090. there was a couple that separated us, maybe some of the more well-known votes. other than that, i'm not quite sure where we disagree. i would think philosophically we're on the same page and hopefully we'll continue to work together. i look forward to hearing more from the senator. >> last question. >> \[inaudible] >> that's a great question. you know, i think if john was here with me today he would say, tim, don't forget, it's not about growing up in life, it's about moving forward. and we define that differently. some see the senate as a move up, and i certainly do as well in a way. but i'm hoping that the message that the
a lot of promise in him from the governing standpoint. he is known in the political world for his budget, yet when he picked him, he never fully embraced the ryan budget and had his own ideas. instantly, you are having an odd bit of tension there. why would pick someone from wisconsin, who came from a swing district in wisconsin and then never really try to campaign in wisconsin? i believe was the same weekend he picked ryan and he never went back until the last week of the election. it's really puzzling. romney had a shot there. go there after you pick someone from that state and you never go back? host: why was john kerry's enormous wealth and not an issue in 2004? guest: it was, but that campaign was so much defined by 9/11, john kerry, and the swift voting issue. the problem is not enormously wealthy candidates, but can they make a pitch to the working-class voters. it does not matter what is in your bank account of what is out there in public. guest: part of the reason john kerry of losses because he and his wife were characterized the same way they did to rodney as the out of touch
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)